Author: Juan Dal Maso

Macri in Government, Bosses in Power

Within days of the second round of presidential elections, Macri announced “a plan of war” with measures of which only the pace is unknown, but the depth is well understood. To take this plan forward, he chose a political staff that matches his ambition: managers and CEOs of multinationals will be taking their places in the new cabinet beginning December 10.

Trotsky, Gramsci and the state in the ‘West’

In his book, The Gramscian Moment, Peter D. Thomas reassesses the ideas of Antonio Gramsci from the starting point of the polemics against Gramsci found in The Antinomies of Antonio Gramsci by Perry Anderson and Reading Capital by Louis Althusser. Thomas presents these critiques of Gramsci’s thought as complementary and coinciding from different angles.

Passive Revolution, Permanent Revolution and Hegemony

It is a recurrent commonplace from most Gramscian intellectuals (as well as some fuming anti-Gramscian intellectuals) to present Gramsci’s theorizations concerning the question of the passive revolution as the ‘objective foundation’ of a ‘hegemonic’ strategy which is in opposition to the permanent revolution.

Macri in Government, Bosses in Power

Within days of the second round of presidential elections, Macri announced “a plan of war” with measures of which only the pace is unknown, but the depth is well understood. To take this plan forward, he chose a political staff that matches his ambition: managers and CEOs of multinationals will be taking their places in the new cabinet beginning December 10.

Trotsky, Gramsci and the state in the ‘West’

In his book, The Gramscian Moment, Peter D. Thomas reassesses the ideas of Antonio Gramsci from the starting point of the polemics against Gramsci found in The Antinomies of Antonio Gramsci by Perry Anderson and Reading Capital by Louis Althusser. Thomas presents these critiques of Gramsci’s thought as complementary and coinciding from different angles.

Pablo Iglesias and his Gramsci ’à la carte’

Spanish version from La Izquierda Diario, May 7, 2015 In his recent article published in Público and republished in the friendly blog Gramscimanía, Pablo Iglesias gives an interpretation of the theory of Antonio Gramsci, tending to justify his electoral politics, after the earthquake suffered by the leadership of PODEMOS facing the resignation of the “number three”, Juan Carlos Monedero. There is a certain internal coherence in the article, however, it is riddled with ideological operations which together express a reduction of the Gramscian thought. Let us see why. Firstly, Iglesias assimilates the concepts of hegemony and trench warfare with that

Passive Revolution, Permanent Revolution and Hegemony

It is a recurrent commonplace from most Gramscian intellectuals (as well as some fuming anti-Gramscian intellectuals) to present Gramsci’s theorizations concerning the question of the passive revolution as the ‘objective foundation’ of a ‘hegemonic’ strategy which is in opposition to the permanent revolution.