Category: Arts

Must See Films for Black History Month

Predictably, Black talent was excluded from mainstream award shows this year despite its strong presence in film and TV. But your Black socialist cinephiles at Left Voice are excited to share our own picks for Black History Month.

Nina Simone: Portrait of a Revolutionary Artist

Nina Simone took the world of her experience, the hatred and anger of a lifetime of racial and sexual violence, and transformed it into a weapon to defend and uplift Black Americans. 

The Testament of Leon Trotsky: In Illustration

On this day 80 years ago, while in exile in Coyoacán, Mexico, Trotsky penned his last Testament, well aware that he might soon be killed or will die because of his deteriorating health. This short text was written a few months before his assassination by Ramón Mercader, a Stalinist agent. In it, Trotsky reflects on his life and his hope for future revolutionary generations.

Radical Reads: Black No More by George S. Schuyler

In Black No More, George S. Schuyler imagines a near-future dystopia in which Black people can undergo a procedure to become indistinguishable from whites. This work, written in the midst of the Harlem Renaissance, is a searing satire of racism in the United States as well as of the limitations of Black capitalism in the fight for liberation.

Who Killed Malcolm X

A new documentary sheds light on the botched investigation of the shooting of Malcolm X, who the real killers were, and who they were working for.

Langston Hughes Reflects on the Promise of The Soviet Union

Not only one of America’s preeminent poets, Langston Hughes was also firmly committed to the liberation of Black people and the working class. His accounts of his journey to the USSR in 1933 provide a powerful insight into the Revolution’s advances in fighting the oppression of religious and ethnic minorities.

How Left Are The 2019 Oscar Films?

The 2019 movie season was dominated by discussions of class and capitalism. From blockbusters like Joker to indie hits like Hustlers to international crossovers like Parasite, the class divide was a key theme in many films with some critics even going so far as to call 2019 the year of class war in film. In this vein, we’ve looked at several of the films that were nominated for Oscars to see how left they really are. 

Class, Morality, and Capitalism in ‘Parasite’

“Parasite” is a cross over hit, becoming the first South Korean film ever nominated for an Oscar. Its success is due to the fact that it encapsulates the parasitic relationship between the rich and the working class

Must See Films for Black History Month

Predictably, Black talent was excluded from mainstream award shows this year despite its strong presence in film and TV. But your Black socialist cinephiles at Left Voice are excited to share our own picks for Black History Month.

Nina Simone: Portrait of a Revolutionary Artist

Nina Simone took the world of her experience, the hatred and anger of a lifetime of racial and sexual violence, and transformed it into a weapon to defend and uplift Black Americans. 

The Testament of Leon Trotsky: In Illustration

On this day 80 years ago, while in exile in Coyoacán, Mexico, Trotsky penned his last Testament, well aware that he might soon be killed or will die because of his deteriorating health. This short text was written a few months before his assassination by Ramón Mercader, a Stalinist agent. In it, Trotsky reflects on his life and his hope for future revolutionary generations.

Radical Reads: Black No More by George S. Schuyler

In Black No More, George S. Schuyler imagines a near-future dystopia in which Black people can undergo a procedure to become indistinguishable from whites. This work, written in the midst of the Harlem Renaissance, is a searing satire of racism in the United States as well as of the limitations of Black capitalism in the fight for liberation.

Who Killed Malcolm X

A new documentary sheds light on the botched investigation of the shooting of Malcolm X, who the real killers were, and who they were working for.

Langston Hughes Reflects on the Promise of The Soviet Union

Not only one of America’s preeminent poets, Langston Hughes was also firmly committed to the liberation of Black people and the working class. His accounts of his journey to the USSR in 1933 provide a powerful insight into the Revolution’s advances in fighting the oppression of religious and ethnic minorities.

How Left Are The 2019 Oscar Films?

The 2019 movie season was dominated by discussions of class and capitalism. From blockbusters like Joker to indie hits like Hustlers to international crossovers like Parasite, the class divide was a key theme in many films with some critics even going so far as to call 2019 the year of class war in film. In this vein, we’ve looked at several of the films that were nominated for Oscars to see how left they really are. 

Class, Morality, and Capitalism in ‘Parasite’

“Parasite” is a cross over hit, becoming the first South Korean film ever nominated for an Oscar. Its success is due to the fact that it encapsulates the parasitic relationship between the rich and the working class