Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube

Arts

Radical Reads: Black No More by George S. Schuyler

In Black No More, George S. Schuyler imagines a near-future dystopia in which Black people can undergo a procedure to become indistinguishable from whites. This work, written in the midst of the Harlem Renaissance, is a searing satire of racism in the United States as well as of the limitations of Black capitalism in the fight for liberation.

Olivia Wood

February 26, 2020

Who Killed Malcolm X

A new documentary sheds light on the botched investigation of the shooting of Malcolm X, who the real killers were, and who they were working for.

Julia Wallace

February 21, 2020

Langston Hughes Reflects on the Promise of The Soviet Union

Not only one of America’s preeminent poets, Langston Hughes was also firmly committed to the liberation of Black people and the working class. His accounts of his journey to the USSR in 1933 provide a powerful insight into the Revolution’s advances in fighting the oppression of religious and ethnic minorities.

Robert Belano

February 18, 2020

Paint and protest: Iraqi protesters transform Baghdad with murals

When the waters of class struggle are stirring, art takes to the streets.

How Left Are The 2019 Oscar Films?

The 2019 movie season was dominated by discussions of class and capitalism. From blockbusters like Joker to indie hits like Hustlers to international crossovers like Parasite, the class divide was a key theme in many films with some critics even going so far as to call 2019 the year of class war in film. In this vein, we’ve looked at several of the films that were nominated for Oscars to see how left they really are. 

Ezra Brain

January 17, 2020

Class, Morality, and Capitalism in ‘Parasite’

"Parasite" is a cross over hit, becoming the first South Korean film ever nominated for an Oscar. Its success is due to the fact that it encapsulates the parasitic relationship between the rich and the working class

Ezra Brain

January 16, 2020

BoJack Horseman: A Manic-Depressive Horse, Loosely Based on Bertolt Brecht

The third season of the cult show BoJack Horseman came out on Netflix in July. Many consider it a satire of the narcissistic world of Hollywood. But in reality, producer Raphael Bob-Waksberg has created a unique work of art about depression – using some of Brecht's tools.

Nathaniel Flakin

March 18, 2017

Trotsky and Holiday Communism in Germany

It's called "Vacation Communism": 70,000 people gather for four days at an old Soviet air base two hours north of Berlin.

Nathaniel Flakin

July 7, 2015