Tag: Arab Spring

Ten Years After the Arab Revolutions

Every revolution is a product of unique circumstances and speaks to the universal experiences of poverty, oppression and violence under capitalism. They tend to erupt when millions of people decide that they can no longer put up with life as usual and when the ruling establishment can no longer control the discontent in the usual ways. Both of these conditions were present in 2011.

The Biggest Revolt of the 21st Century: Ten Years after the Arab Spring

Ten years ago today, a young fruit vendor in Tunisia, Mohamed Bouazizi, set himself on fire after being harassed by the police. Shortly thereafter, protests started in Tunisia and quickly spread throughout the Middle East and North Africa. What can socialists learn from the Arab Spring and its aftermath?

The End of a Dream: From Arab Spring to Bloody Fall (Part 2)

On the 17th of December, 2010, in the village of Sidi Bouzid, Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire. His act was the starting point of a wave of upheavals in the Arab world. Five years later, the region is sinking into chaos and violence. Is the dream of freedom and justice finally over?

The End of a Dream: From Arab Spring to Bloody Fall (Part I)

On the 17 of December 2010, in the village of Sidi Bouzid, Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire. His act was the starting point of a wave of upheavals in the Arab world. Five years later, the region is sinking into chaos and violence. Is the dream of freedom and justice finally burst? This is a two-part retrospective on the Arab Spring –five years later.

Israel and imperialism, out of Syria

In less than 48 hours, the State of Israel launched two rounds of aerial bombardments against military targets on the outskirts of Damascus, allegedly to

“The people want the regime to fall”

The old slogan, that hundreds of thousands were shouting against the Mubarak dictatorship at the beginning of 2011, is again resounding with all its force

Down with Assad’s Brutal Repression! No to Imperialist Interference and Intervention!

The massacre of approximately 116 civilians in Houla, near the opposition-held city of Homs, is one of the bloodiest acts since the uprising against Assad’s regime began, 14 months ago. As on other occasions, the government admits the slaughter, but it is trying to hold “Al Qaeda terrorists” responsible for what happened. However, the regime has not offered any serious evidence that would support its version or refute the accounts of the massacre by survivors.

Act Two of the Revolutionary Process

The brutal police repression against a small group of demonstrators in Tahrir Square on November 19 was the detonator of an impressive popular mobilization that

Ten Years After the Arab Revolutions

Every revolution is a product of unique circumstances and speaks to the universal experiences of poverty, oppression and violence under capitalism. They tend to erupt when millions of people decide that they can no longer put up with life as usual and when the ruling establishment can no longer control the discontent in the usual ways. Both of these conditions were present in 2011.

The Biggest Revolt of the 21st Century: Ten Years after the Arab Spring

Ten years ago today, a young fruit vendor in Tunisia, Mohamed Bouazizi, set himself on fire after being harassed by the police. Shortly thereafter, protests started in Tunisia and quickly spread throughout the Middle East and North Africa. What can socialists learn from the Arab Spring and its aftermath?

The End of a Dream: From Arab Spring to Bloody Fall (Part 2)

On the 17th of December, 2010, in the village of Sidi Bouzid, Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire. His act was the starting point of a wave of upheavals in the Arab world. Five years later, the region is sinking into chaos and violence. Is the dream of freedom and justice finally over?

The End of a Dream: From Arab Spring to Bloody Fall (Part I)

On the 17 of December 2010, in the village of Sidi Bouzid, Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire. His act was the starting point of a wave of upheavals in the Arab world. Five years later, the region is sinking into chaos and violence. Is the dream of freedom and justice finally burst? This is a two-part retrospective on the Arab Spring –five years later.

Israel and imperialism, out of Syria

In less than 48 hours, the State of Israel launched two rounds of aerial bombardments against military targets on the outskirts of Damascus, allegedly to prevent a quantity of more sophisticated missiles, of Iranian manufacture, from reaching Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shiite militia that defeated Israel in the last Lebanon war, in 2006. Although Israel had already bombed Syrian territory in January of this year, the scope of these bombardments was much greater, just like their repercussions. Although Netanyahu’s government did not openly take responsibility for this real act of war, US President Barack Obama quickly vindicated the State of Israel’s

“The people want the regime to fall”

The old slogan, that hundreds of thousands were shouting against the Mubarak dictatorship at the beginning of 2011, is again resounding with all its force in the streets of Cairo and the main cities of Egypt, this time directed against the government of M. Morsi and the Freedom and Justice Party (linked to the Muslim Brotherhood) and the Constituent Assembly with a majority from Islamist parties. For two weeks now, hundreds of thousands of middle-class young people, students, women, workers, groups of the poor, have been mobilizing against the decree by which the Egyptian President allocated quasi-dictatorial powers to himself,

Down with Assad’s Brutal Repression! No to Imperialist Interference and Intervention!

The massacre of approximately 116 civilians in Houla, near the opposition-held city of Homs, is one of the bloodiest acts since the uprising against Assad’s regime began, 14 months ago. As on other occasions, the government admits the slaughter, but it is trying to hold “Al Qaeda terrorists” responsible for what happened. However, the regime has not offered any serious evidence that would support its version or refute the accounts of the massacre by survivors.

Act Two of the Revolutionary Process

The brutal police repression against a small group of demonstrators in Tahrir Square on November 19 was the detonator of an impressive popular mobilization that was increasing in numbers and radicalization as time passed. The policy of the governing Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), of trying to stop this new wave of demonstrations with the police forces from Central Security, that fired poison gases, rubber and lead bullets, leaving 35 people dead and more than 2,000 wounded, had a contrary result to that hoped for by the military junta: hundreds of thousands of people in the streets of