Tag: Pablo Iglesias

Is it a Betrayal for Podemos to Join the Spanish Government?

In the aftermath of the November 10 elections in the Spanish State, the left-wing Podemos party has agreed to join a government with Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez’s PSOE. It is an alliance fraught with traps for the Spanish working-class.

Syriza and Podemos: A Necessary Balance Sheet

Syriza and Podemos emerged in Southern Europe in the context of a deep capitalist crisis and a concomitant crisis of the political regimes. Both political formations occupied the vacant space left by the decline in popularity of European social democracies, who are responsible for rigorously implementing the neoliberal agenda against workers and youth over the last decades.

Spain: trying to break the Electoral Gridlock

The results of the general elections have opened a political crisis in Spain. Now that a coalition between the PSOE and PP is off the table, at least 3 parties would have to collude to be able to form government. A broad-left coalition gains momentum.

From the Podemos hypothesis to the test of power

Podemos was born one and a half years ago. It presented itself as something new, a participatory movement “open to all citizens”. Referring to the movement of the Spanish “indignados” (the ‘indignant’ or ‘outraged’) that emerged on May 15, 2011, Pablo Iglesias at the time announced that, “We said in the plazas that it can be done and we are saying today that we can do it”.

Is it a Betrayal for Podemos to Join the Spanish Government?

In the aftermath of the November 10 elections in the Spanish State, the left-wing Podemos party has agreed to join a government with Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez’s PSOE. It is an alliance fraught with traps for the Spanish working-class.

Syriza and Podemos: A Necessary Balance Sheet

Syriza and Podemos emerged in Southern Europe in the context of a deep capitalist crisis and a concomitant crisis of the political regimes. Both political formations occupied the vacant space left by the decline in popularity of European social democracies, who are responsible for rigorously implementing the neoliberal agenda against workers and youth over the last decades.

Spain: trying to break the Electoral Gridlock

The results of the general elections have opened a political crisis in Spain. Now that a coalition between the PSOE and PP is off the table, at least 3 parties would have to collude to be able to form government. A broad-left coalition gains momentum.

From the Podemos hypothesis to the test of power

Podemos was born one and a half years ago. It presented itself as something new, a participatory movement “open to all citizens”. Referring to the movement of the Spanish “indignados” (the ‘indignant’ or ‘outraged’) that emerged on May 15, 2011, Pablo Iglesias at the time announced that, “We said in the plazas that it can be done and we are saying today that we can do it”.

Pablo Iglesias and his Gramsci ’à la carte’

Spanish version from La Izquierda Diario, May 7, 2015 In his recent article published in Público and republished in the friendly blog Gramscimanía, Pablo Iglesias gives an interpretation of the theory of Antonio Gramsci, tending to justify his electoral politics, after the earthquake suffered by the leadership of PODEMOS facing the resignation of the “number three”, Juan Carlos Monedero. There is a certain internal coherence in the article, however, it is riddled with ideological operations which together express a reduction of the Gramscian thought. Let us see why. Firstly, Iglesias assimilates the concepts of hegemony and trench warfare with that