Latin America


CHIAPAS: Teachers’ movement burns down the offices of the National Electoral Institute (INE)

The 7th section of the National Teachers Union (SNTE), which is part of the National Coordinator of Teachers (CNTE), took over two of the main National Electoral Institute (INE) offices in the State of Chiapas and have since burned them down. This action is part of the protests against the elections that the teachers' movement is organizing nationwide.

June 04, 2015

PH: La Izquierda Diario Mexico

Spanish version from La Izquierda Diario México: Magisterio quema instalaciones del INE en Chiapas

Previous uptdates:

- Oaxaca y Guerrero: magisterio quema miles de boletas electorales
- Student teachers (Normalistas) take over radio stations in Guerrero, Mexico

The teachers of Section 7, who since June 1st have been involved in an indefinite strike, took over 10 gas stations and gave the gas away to commuters. According to the newspaper “Excelsior,” the Permanent State Assembly of section 7th voted that the gas stations that were taken over had to give away their gas for free.

Thousands of teachers blocked the roads in Tuxtla Guiterrez and ransacked a Coca Cola truck and a truck from the chain store Bimbo. They have occupied the INE offices since June 3rd and have now set them on fire.

At the entrance of Tuxtla, a location known as La Pochota, which is on route to Mexico City, teachers emptied a truck hauling plastic cups, a milk truck, and a wheat truck. They shared the contents of the trucks with commuters and people walking by.

According to the newspaper “Proceso”, “The inside of the two main offices of INE were painted with graffiti referencing the missing 43 students from Ayotzinapa. Since June 1st, the teachers have been leading mobilizations, denouncing the electoral process, and backing the parents of the 43 disappeared students.”

In the Pochota region, the teachers burned documents pertaining to the Civil Protection office, which is part of a government body of electoral supervisors known as the OFSC, ( Órgano de Fiscalización Superior del Congreso del Estado). In the city of Comalapa, residents occupied the government offices of the Secretary of Social Development (SEDESOL).

These are the most troublesome elections in decades. It is a clear indication of how fraudulent the process of “organized transition” has been since it began in the year 2000.

The family members of the 43 disappeared students have called for the denouncement of the elections and have demanded the return of the disappeared. Organizations like the MTS (Movimiento de los Trabajadores Socialistas) are calling for an invalid ballot vote that reads the slogan #Faltan43 (We’re missing 43 students)

Translated by Sara Jayne @surdaso


Mexico   /    Latin America