hegemony

Trotsky, Gramsci, and the Emergence of the Working Class as Hegemonic Subject

Employing the words of Trotsky and Gramsci, the authors analyze the development of the working class as a social and political subject in “Western” countries, with their complex socio-political structures. To argue against the idea of conquering spaces within the regime and coexisting peacefully with the bureaucracies of the mass movement, as well as against the adaptation to administering the state’s social assistance or to the current structure of unions, they draw on Trotsky’s writings on France, in which he introduces the concept of “committees of action” of the vanguard and sectors of the masses as a way to unify and coordinate their struggles.

Subaltern Hegemony and the Recomposition of the Left

Autonomy, strategy, experimentation and creativity will all be necessary in order for the subaltern classes and the Left to develop their own hegemonic forms and practices. Doing so will be necessary to challenge capitalist social relations and hegemony.

Soviet Hegemony

Craig Brandist speaks about hegemony, the national question and colonialism in the early years of the USSR.

Gramsci’s Three Moments of Hegemony

Proletarian hegemony is paramount to winning mass support and taking power, as well as during the transition to socialism. This article describes three moments, or levels of analysis with which to understand the conditions for proletarian hegemony.