Author: Juan Dal Maso

The Transitional Program: A Manifesto for Urgent Struggle

The Transitional Program was drafted in 1938 by Trotsky and includes democratic demands (such as for the struggle for the agrarian revolution and national independence of colonized nations), minimal demands (such as for the eight-hour workday and wage increases), transitional demands (like those for the abolition of trade secrets, workers’ control of industry and nationalization of the banking system, and for workers’ and peasants’ governments), and organizational demands (such as self-defense pickets, the creation of a workers’ militia, and for workers councils or soviets).

Subaltern Hegemony and the Recomposition of the Left

Autonomy, strategy, experimentation and creativity will all be necessary in order for the subaltern classes and the Left to develop their own hegemonic forms and practices. Doing so will be necessary to challenge capitalist social relations and hegemony.

Class, Social Movements and the Return of Marxism

In this article, the Argentinian Marxist Juan Dal Maso discusses the post-Marxist currents in Latin America and poses the challenges socialists face to articulate the class struggle and the resistance of social movements against capital.

Fidel, Che and Socialism in Cuba

Ernesto “Che” Guevara highlighted in his article “Socialism and Man in Cuba” a series of problems related to the “transition to socialism” on the island that are still relevant 60 years after the triumph of the Cuban revolution.

Althusser vs. Althusser

Louis Althusser (1918-1990), the French philosopher born in Algeria, is one of the main intellectual figures of European Marxism in the post-World War II era. A member of the French Communist Party, and a supporter, in his own way, of Maoism, he is known as the main proponent of what was called the “structural Marxist” school of thought. Some of his concepts were incorporated into the social sciences. Two examples that are fairly well-known are the terms overdetermination and ideological state apparatuses.

Gramsci’s Three Moments of Hegemony

Proletarian hegemony is paramount to winning mass support and taking power, as well as during the transition to socialism. This article describes three moments, or levels of analysis with which to understand the conditions for proletarian hegemony.

Macri in Government, Bosses in Power

Within days of the second round of presidential elections, Macri announced “a plan of war” with measures of which only the pace is unknown, but the depth is well understood. To take this plan forward, he chose a political staff that matches his ambition: managers and CEOs of multinationals will be taking their places in the new cabinet beginning December 10.

The Transitional Program: A Manifesto for Urgent Struggle

The Transitional Program was drafted in 1938 by Trotsky and includes democratic demands (such as for the struggle for the agrarian revolution and national independence of colonized nations), minimal demands (such as for the eight-hour workday and wage increases), transitional demands (like those for the abolition of trade secrets, workers’ control of industry and nationalization of the banking system, and for workers’ and peasants’ governments), and organizational demands (such as self-defense pickets, the creation of a workers’ militia, and for workers councils or soviets).

Subaltern Hegemony and the Recomposition of the Left

Autonomy, strategy, experimentation and creativity will all be necessary in order for the subaltern classes and the Left to develop their own hegemonic forms and practices. Doing so will be necessary to challenge capitalist social relations and hegemony.

Class, Social Movements and the Return of Marxism

In this article, the Argentinian Marxist Juan Dal Maso discusses the post-Marxist currents in Latin America and poses the challenges socialists face to articulate the class struggle and the resistance of social movements against capital.

Fidel, Che and Socialism in Cuba

Ernesto “Che” Guevara highlighted in his article “Socialism and Man in Cuba” a series of problems related to the “transition to socialism” on the island that are still relevant 60 years after the triumph of the Cuban revolution.

Althusser vs. Althusser

Louis Althusser (1918-1990), the French philosopher born in Algeria, is one of the main intellectual figures of European Marxism in the post-World War II era. A member of the French Communist Party, and a supporter, in his own way, of Maoism, he is known as the main proponent of what was called the “structural Marxist” school of thought. Some of his concepts were incorporated into the social sciences. Two examples that are fairly well-known are the terms overdetermination and ideological state apparatuses.

Gramsci’s Three Moments of Hegemony

Proletarian hegemony is paramount to winning mass support and taking power, as well as during the transition to socialism. This article describes three moments, or levels of analysis with which to understand the conditions for proletarian hegemony.

Macri in Government, Bosses in Power

Within days of the second round of presidential elections, Macri announced “a plan of war” with measures of which only the pace is unknown, but the depth is well understood. To take this plan forward, he chose a political staff that matches his ambition: managers and CEOs of multinationals will be taking their places in the new cabinet beginning December 10.